The Architecture of Proximity

Zullo/Raw Movement’s production The Architecture of Proximity is an immersive dance and performance experience exploring the relationship between the architecture of spaces and the physical, psychological and emotional effects of space on the body.

We asked Artistic Director of Zullo/Raw Movement, John Zullo a few questions about his new piece opening in the Theater at the 14th Street Y this Wednesday, October 28th.

Zullo Raw Movement

How would you describe this show to someone that has never experience immersive dance or theater? 

This performance is different from most other performances because there is no seating, therefore the audience is asked to stand during the duration of the performance with freedom to walk around the space. I liken the experience to being at a museum or gallery where you are moving through actively looking and engaging with the works. This allows for a more intimate experience of the work and to actually become part of the whole performance experience.

How did you first become involved with the Y?

I first heard about the Theater at the 14th Street Y when I was at the APAP conference last January.  I visited their booth, and  was able to talk to your staff to learn more about the space.  I like spaces that are unexpected.  My company has been performing mostly in the East Village, and I didn’t know that the Y had this venue.  I think this space allows for the piece to have a blank slate without the space defining the piece.  Instead, this piece is able to define the space.

What do you feel is an important theme of this piece?

In this case, it is playing with borders and boundaries that separate us and erasing them to find communality amongst individuals. It is creating an experience that forces people to deal with and negotiate the relationships that they have with each other and spaces.  Then, we are able to see how physical spaces can affect people physically, emotionally and psychologically.  In this piece, which I think more of as a movement based installation, is immersive through the convergence of movement, sound, architectural spaces, and light.  Through this, we are able to explore the possibility of it all working together– the movement is indicative of the spaces in our lives.

Is there anything else the audience should expect?

My goals for the audience are that they first, experience something that they have never experience before, and second, that they are transformed by the end of the installation.  I hope that the audience is able to find  a sense of openness, and are open to going on this journey with the performers.  The audience becomes part of the work as they are physically engaged in the piece.  Also, I encourage the audience to take photographs (no flash only) during the performance and tag @zullorawmovement on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook!

 

The Architecture of Proximity will be playing at the Theater at the 14th Street Y

October 28th-Nov. 1st

Buy Tickets Here

$14 at 14Y – Dance Series Launch

The Theater at the 14th Street Y is excited to announce our 2015-2016 Dance Subscription Series, $14 at 14Y. Join our subscription today and choose any 3 shows for $42 – that breaks down to just $14 per ticket!

Check out our eight professional companies below to create your custom series!

Sonia Olla Flamenco Dance Company – Flamenco

As an Internationally recognized dancer and choreographer, Sonia Olla is known for her impeccable technique and riveting  stage presence. Get a preview here.

Zullo: Raw Movement – Immersive Dance

Zullo/RawMovement is exploring ideas and concepts from our cultural landscape that are transformed into works that are expressive, imaginative and explosive. Check them out here.

BARE Dance Company – Contemporary

BARE’s versitile approach to movement has been described as “smart, effective, technically accomplished work.” – Michael Upchurch, Seattle Times. Watch now.

of bones || hollye bynum – Contemporary, Film

of bones || hollye bynum seeks to find commonalities between dance and viewer by introspectively exploring the human experience. See for yourself here.

Joffrey Ballet School – Ballet

The Joffrey Ballet School transforms passionate dance students into versatile, individualistic artists able to collaborate and evolve fluidly in a fast-changing society. Watch them here.

Sokolow Theatre/Dance Ensemble – Contemporary, Theatre

Sokolow Theatre/Dance Ensemble’s aim is to recreate works choreographed by Anna Sokolow, continue her teachings, and develop her artistic vision for the purpose of passing on for posterity. See their work here.

From the Horse’s Mouth – Various

From the Horse’s Mouth celebrates the “heart and history of dance” with outstanding dancers and choreographers of all ages and traditions, performing together and telling their extraordinary personal stories. Catch a glimpse here.

American Tap Dance Foundation – Tap

ATDF is committed to establishing and legitimizing tap dance as a vital component of American dance through creation, presentation, education and preservation. Tap along here.

Composting at Camp!

With the launch of our successful composting drop off program last March, the 14th Street Y has discovered how willing people are to participate in composting when given the opportunity to do so. Composting is a great eco educational tool for kids, and it’s never had more room to shine than right now, at our New Country Day Camp. Today we’re sharing a blog written by Aneta, New Country’s very own Greening Coordinator! .

Kids learn about composting at New Country Day Camp!
Kids learn about composting at New Country Day Camp!

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We are very excited to introduce to you our Composting and Gardening program at New Country Day Camp in summer 2013 where campers and staff have been busy playing, smiling, and composting!

Our environmental program exposed 600+ children, from ages 4-12, and 100+ staff to the environmental advantages of composting and Jewish values that are associated with environmental advocacy. The program consisted of a diverse exposure not only to composting, but to gardening, environmental interconnectedness and our responsibility as members and leaders in this world. Campers were introduced to our worm bins, our metal can compost bins, our sensory/Havdalah garden and lead through activities on the "what, how and why" of compost. Our sensory garden featured plants that stimulated different senses: basil and stevia for taste, spearmint, peppermint and English lavender for smell, sunflowers for sight, dusty miller and lemongrass for touch and echinacea for sound because of its attraction to songbirds. It was also entitled a Havdalah garden because it reminds children of the ceremony we have after Shabbat, in which we use our senses to taste the wine, smell the herbs and see the candle.

At lunch, and after every Sustainable snack, children were reminded to throw their food scraps into our green composting bins filled with our compostable bio-bags. A "Yay or Nay" sign supplemented the reminder by showing children what could be (hence the yay!) and what could not be (nay) composted.

Every Wednesday and Friday, the bio-bags were collected and brought onto the Manhattan buses to be brought back to the Y, where it was compiled with the Y's compost. This acted as a zero-carbon footprint method because our children were already traveling on the buses back and forth from camp and the net worth of our compost collection was greater because of the variety of items the Y accepted for composting. On average, NCDC diverted about 130 pounds of food scraps away from landfills and into nutritious soil a week. At the end of Week 5, NCDC has composted 685 pounds of compost and is expected to produce over a thousand pounds in one camp season! That's a whole lot of soil that then is used for local farms upstate.

As for programming, campers how to create seed globes, which are small balls of organic compost, water, red art clay and seeds that act as micro-environments for plants to grow almost anywhere, and exposed campers to Jewish values such as Bal Taschit (avoiding waste), L'avdah u'leshamrah (protecting the environment), Manhigut (leadership) and Arevut (mutual responsibility).

We illustrated the values of composting by creating educational and experiential opportunities for the campers to engage in throughout the day in their age and subject based units. As Greening Coordinator, I designed programming that intertwined environmental education along with each unit. For example, we set up our compost bins, built our sensory/Havdalah garden and made mint lemonade from our garden with CCP, our Cooking, Camping and Pioneering Unit. With Gymnastics, we discussed the importance of a closed cycle and brainstormed other cycles that exist in our lives, such as the cycles of the moon and sun, the planets, and the life cycles of plants and animals. We manifested these ideas through body movements in a show during Shabbat. For Arts and Crafts, we built recycled scarecrows for our garden made out of toilet paper rolls, milk jugs and old clothing. With Science and Technology, we did soil testing, used this information to decide upon the location for next year's planter box and planted sunflowers as an activity for teaching phytoremediation. For Performing Arts, we created stop-motion films that both promoted and educated composting and environmental work to campers and you! the parents.

We couldn't have done it without your campers! To continue your camper's composting efforts and help bring the habit home, below are a few links on how to deal with the food waste that your home produces:

1. A worm bin is a great way to do indoor composting. Worm bins can be purchased through the Lower East Side Ecology Center: http://www.lesecologycenter.org/index.php/composting.html. They even have a compost hotline!

2. Outdoor compost bins are also an option for any outdoor space.

3. GreenMarkets accept compost collections, and other forms of recycling such as textile recycling, from homes at varying times and locations in NYC: http://www.grownyc.org/greenmarket/ourmarkets. An excellent way to keep food scraps in your home in between visits is to freeze your compost!

4. Last but not least, the Y is happy to accept any and all of your compost. Click here to learn about the Y’s Composting Program!

Join our campers in our composting efforts and keep on composting!

Aneta Bujno, our Greening Coordinator, has worked at NCDC for five summers. Aneta learned how to teach environmental education by volunteering at Bushwick City Farm, a grassroots community organization in Bushwick, Brooklyn.

Our Community Composting Program

Are you composting with us yet?

In March, we began our Community Composting Pilot to help busy urban dwellers like you keep food waste out of the landfill.  It’s easy to do!  Just collect your food waste at home (even meat and dairy is eligible for this program) and bring it to the Y.  Once you’re here, you can weigh it and text the amount to track your diversion rate.  Each text enters you into a raffle to win great things from our community.  April’s raffle prize is a $50 gift certificate from Northern Spy , an amazing restauraunt that uses local, fresh and seasonal foods.

Our goal is to sign up 150 households, and  divert 1 ton of food waste from the landfill by EARTH DAY!  (that’s 4/22/13)

Have you signed up to compost with us?  Just email Camille_Diamond@14StreetY.org to get started.  Keep food out of the landfill, send it back to the earth, and complete the food cycle!

For more information, visit www.14StreetY.org/compost

Bringing Art and Social Change into Collaboration (BASiC) at the 14th Street Y

The BASiC Theatre Project has brought an exciting, young work to the 14th street Y this week! The Mistakes Madeline Made By: Elizabeth Meriwether gives a darkly comedic take on the challenges of life after graduating college and coming to the big city that is NYC. Zi Alikhan, the Artistic Director and creator of the BASiC Theatre Project company has given us a little more insight on how the company came to me and what to expect in the upcoming production.

Tell us about the BASiC Theatre Project? How did it come to be and what does it stand for?

The BASiC, in BASiC Theatre Project stands for Bringing Art and Social Change into Collaboration. When first moving from California to New York City, I had my mind and heart set on Broadway. However, once in the city, I became aware of the vibrant theater scene below 42nd street and how theater as change and theater that has audiences needing to speak up excited me the most. I began directing plays that had these themes in mind. The first play I directed, Gross Indecency, displayed a cast of mainly friends or people I had worked with before. These 9 guys became the BASiC Theatre Company. We already have three new shows this year and are excited for what the future holds!

Why was this specific play, The Mistakes Madeline Made By: Elizabeth Meriwether chosen this year?

I first read this play as a student at NYU in a class called Contemporary Playwrights. This was the first play that I read in class that I was very taken by. When the playwright came in and spoke to our class, I was also very moved by her, specifically how young she was and how similar she seemed to me and my classmates. This playwright, Elizabeth Meriwether, only a few years later went on to write the screenplay for the movie, No Strings Attached and write and produce the new hit TV series, New Girl. The idea that this playwright seemed to begin her career right where my friends and I were at made this play that much more relatable to me and our generation.
The play presents the story of a young girl who graduates from a good college and moves to NYC to follow her dreams only to find out that city life is not quite as glamorous as it sounds. The play is set in 2006 and also presents themes of war and how greatly our society is effected by it. With a love story also mixed in, this play has something for everybody. Meriwether uses young, contemporary style language and yet the play speaks to all ages. We are excited to see what the 14th and 1st community thinks of it!

Speaking of the community, what excites you about bringing this production to the 14th Street Y Theater?

When studying at NYU, I was always aware that cool things were happening at the 14th Street Y Theater. I had such an admiration for this space in college and it is such a privilege to be back with my own production. It really feels like a homecoming to be back at 14th and 1st and I am thrilled to bring this specific play to the diverse East Village. I think the messages of this play speak to the eclectic culture of this area. We can’t wait to show this community who we are through The Mistakes Madeline Made.

How can our members learn more?

Feel free to visit the website at basictheatreproject.com for more information.

Click here to buy tickets or call 1-800-838-3006